How the computer viruses looked like in the 80s and 90s of the last century

How the computer viruses looked like in the 80s and 90s of the last century

Mikko Hipponen, Lead Researcher at F-Secure (Cyber ​​Security), has been involved in computer viruses for over 25 years. Over the years, he has developed a hobby: to secure the most interesting “malware” and keep them at home. The result is a whole collection – and you’ll love it!

Mikko recently found out that the Internet Archive organization allows you to run software designed to work in DOS, and immediately got the idea to put his “collection” on public display.

He stored malware of the old days on a 5.25-inch floppy disk. Hipponen removed all dangerous code from the software and left only visual effects. Now all his finds can be viewed right now on the Malware Museum online archive site. The “ticket” to the “exhibition” is free, all that is required from the user is a modern browser.

Jason Scott, who keeps track of the software collection in the Internet Archive and who helped create the Malware Museum, is sure that viruses can and should be assessed not only by their degree of danger, but also in terms of aesthetics and history:

“After neutralization and confinement in the narrow frames of the emulator, they look like an object of art. From such a safe distance, many people can see how it was possible to become infected with these viruses and what kind of threat they carried. “

Scott says that the “museum of viruses” has already interested many people: the collection, which originally numbered only 30 copies of malicious code, has already grown to 80 pieces – users are willing to put their viruses on public display.

Here are just a few of them:

Q Walker

A cartoon character suddenly starts walking on the computer screen (you yourself understand, he has nothing to do here under normal conditions):

Q Walker

Delyrium

The “victim” has the feeling that the PC screen is in the epicenter of an earthquake:

Delyrium

LSD

Everything is so bright:

LSD

Zohra

Slowly, line by line, the screen “turns black”, and at the end a frightening message appears: Zora will live forever, and with her – and necromancy.

Zohra

Q Casino

Hipponen’s favorite virus. Forces the victim to play roulette. All user files are at stake!

Q Casino

Crew

Everything here is much more prosaic – the “picture” on the monitor is simply replaced with the logo of the team of hackers who wrote the virus.

Crew

Flame

What can you say – flame is flame.

Flame

Hymn

The text in a frame is displayed on the screen one after the other. It is noteworthy that the first word is “USSR” (USSR).

Hymn

Nail

Part of the “picture” on the monitor is replaced by multi-colored rectangles in which the word “Kuku” appears and blinks.

Nail

 

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